Traitors, Bombs, Spies and Coup - Macedonian Political Surrealism

On 31st January 2015 the Macedonian Prime Minister, Nikola Gruevski, publicly announced that the state institutions are persecuting Mr. Zoran Zaev, the leader of the Social Democratic Union (SDSM) opposition party, for espionage and violence against representatives of top state authorities with a purpose of violently undermining the constitutional order.  Gruevski claims that he held four meetings with Zaev in the period between September and November 2014, during which  Zaev pushed for forming a technical government under the threat that...

Deciphering the Greek Election Results: A Few Preliminary Thoughts

The verdict of the Greek people in the national elections of 25 January 2015 was loud and clear. The Coalition of the Radical Left (Syriza) prevailed, winning 36.3% of votes against 27.8% of New Democracy (ND), the main centre-right party. The Greek voters unequivocally expressed their exhaustion, despair and resent caused by a five-year-long period of recession and austerity policies.

The far-right party of Golden Dawn (XA) got 6.3% of votes despite a series of revelations concerning its criminal activities and the imprisonment of almost its entire political...

The new kid on the block: a short intro to the China-WB relationship

On its way to becoming a global power the influence of China is increasingly being felt worldwide. China not only plays a transformative role in Central Asia, Africa and Latin America but has also caused the American pivot to the Pacific while being Europe’s most significant economic partner amidst the global financial crisis. In the last several years, China  has come in unprecedented ways to the Western Balkans (WB) as well. Miniscule in size and power, the countries in the region have yet to learn about China and contemplate their position in the new global landscape.

...

The Brussels Dialogue Should Seize the Fragile Momentum in the New Kosovo Government

The historic Brussels Agreement of 19 April 2013 between the governments of Serbia and Kosovo, which rounded up a series of technical agreements, set high hopes for the normalisation of relations between the two. Some of the agreements’ most ostensible and clearly defined points have been (partially) implemented – such as the establishment of freedom of movement and goods, the mutual recognition of diplomas and the exchange of civil registry documents, the integration of the Kosovo Police, and...

'Skopje, you will be joy' – an account of the student protests in Macedonia

Recently, the government of Macedonia, led by the national-conservative party (VMRO-DPMNE), has announced new amendments to the Law on Higher Education. The new Law, according to the authorities, should improve the quality of education in Macedonia. The proposed amendments envisage students to take an 'external examination' twice before graduation. Should students fail the testing, they will not be able to continue with the studies until they pass the 'external/state exam'.

Shortly after the government let the public know about their intention, the students formed a...

From student protests to movement – the (un)expected reinvention of politics in Macedonia

On December 10th 2014, tens of thousands of university and secondary students, citizens and supporters took to the streets in several towns/cities in Macedonia and clearly expressed their “No” to the governmental plan to introduce external or state-tests for university students of all degrees. Realistic estimates place over 10.000 protestors at the march in Skopje, which in fact is the greatest non-partisan, civil society and cross-ethnic mobilization in modern Macedonian history.

Just a day before the event...

Macedonian Student's Plenum - A Cry for Respect.

On December 10th, 2014 thousands of students defied the Government led by Prime Minister Nikola Gruevski and took to the streets of Skopje, Macedonia's capital city.

Despite harassment, intimidation and a campaign led by the government supported media to discredit them, the students marched to the government buildings and demanded that the government withdraw its plan to introduce a state imposed exam before graduation.

For a period of time during the demonstration internet access was blocked, thus preventing the use of social media by the students. This...

Without a clear plan towards transitional justice, the current lustration initiatives in post-communist Albania could be too little, too late

On November 29th, Albania celebrated the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II and its liberation from the Nazi forces. The coalition government, made-up of the Albanian Socialist Party (PS) and the Socialist Movement for Integration (LSI), took the lead in a series of commemorative events during the weeks and months preceding the anniversary. The high point of this campaign was the public opening of one of the most secretive anti-nuclear bunkers in Shtish-Tufina, a village 1.5 km away from the center of the capital, Tirana. The Albanian PM, Edi Rama, announced a radical break with...

What does it mean that Serbia refuses to align itself with European sanctions against Russia?

The Russian annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol in March 2014 has caused a stir down to the Balkans. By refusing to align itself with European sanctions against Moscow, Serbia keeps infuriating Brussels. Increasing pressure on the government won’t help, on the contrary.

Serbia’s support for Russia is no surprise

During its two-year honeymoon with Serbia, the EU was starry-eyed about Belgrade’s leaders. The concessions they made to Kosovo, which led to the “historic agreement” of April 2013, put them on a pedestal. The fact that the government...

The fall of the Berlin Wall and post-Yugoslav transition

Post-communist transition, in post-Yugoslav states, contributed significantly to the uneven progress of changes that unfolded in the past quarter of a century across the Eastern parts of Europe. Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin wall, the post-Yugoslav part of Europe’s former, communist universe firmly stands between the, more successful, transition-achievers of Central-East Europe and the, less successful, transition-non-achievers of the post-Soviet states.

The satisfaction that political and economic accomplishments are not as bad as most of the ex-Soviet lands’ is...

Pages